Who are we?
Newtown Mission is a group of people from diverse social and ethnic backgrounds and various ages.

Our community is relaxed, informal and held together by our desire to know God more deeply. We are passionate about following Jesus, living alongside the vulnerable and sharing God’s good news story, being part of changing the world!

We are a congregation of the Uniting Church of Australia.

Our Vision Statement
Newtown Mission seeks to be: an open community committed to passionate worship of Jesus Christ, with sound biblical teaching and the transformation of lives through outreach, discipleship and compassionate care, empowered by the Holy Spirit. Click here for more info on ‘what we believe’.

What do we do
We’re called a ‘Mission’ because our identity is all about God’s call to us to be part of changing the world! If you become part of Newtown Mission you’ll find yourself challenged to live life with others, for others.
That happens in our everyday life, and also in activities done through the church – in Newtown there’s the Community Care Centre, Revelation Ceiling and Alpha; in Annandale the Creative Arts Centre has a special focus on the Arts community.

Alongside these activities there’s a commitment to the wider world. Newtown Mission directly supports more than 20 workers around the world, all of whom were at one time part of the church!

God-Gatherings
Getting together with God and each other is a big part of Newtown Mission life.

Newtown Mission God-Gatherings are generally informal, and usually involves a time of singing and reflection, open sharing time, and teaching from the Bible. God-Gatherings are usually followed by morning tea/supper, with some of Newtown’s finest instant coffee on offer!

Full details and times are available on the Worship page, here.

Newtown Mission and the Uniting Church

Newtown Mission traces its roots to a Wesleyan Methodist Church established in Newtown in 1840. Later the church became known as Newtown Methodist Church, with a ministry that encompassed Word and Deed, sharing and living the gospel in words and actions.

In 1977, after years of planning and negotiation, Australia’s first home-grown mainline church was established, drawing together the Methodist Church of Australasia, the Presbyterian Church of Australia and the Congregational Union of Australia to become the Uniting Church. As a Methodist church, Newtown Mission became part of the Uniting Church. The Uniting Church was founded on the ecumenical principle of working together while recognising the diversity of the bodies represented within.

Today the Uniting Church is the third largest Christian denomination in Australia with about 300,000 members across some 2,800 congregations. Decision making is devolved among the many congregations and this administrative structure gives it a strength that enables a flexible, co-operative and ever changing church.

The Uniting Church has a commitment to love God and others. Congregations nurture the spiritual, social and educational growth of members, welcoming people to engage theologically and biblically with the life of the church.

It is fuelled by the belief that Christians are called to bear witness to a unity of faith and life in Jesus Christ which transcends cultural, economic and racial boundaries. To this end, the Uniting Church plays an active role in the political life of Australia, with an eye on the moral, ethical and social issues that shape the nation. The Uniting Church stands alongside marginalised people and seeks to give a voice to those who are most in need.

The Uniting Church has congregations throughout Australia with a broad range of theological and spiritual views and practices, worship styles, social opinions and mission focuses. The Uniting Aboriginal and Islander Christian Congress is the Aboriginal arm of the church with some 10,000 to 15,000 Aboriginal and Islander people involved.  Around five to seven per cent of Uniting Church members worship in languages other than English, representing about 25 different language groups as well as various Aboriginal tribal languages.

The Uniting Church in Australia has made provision in its regulation for parish missions. Under Uniting Church in Australia regulations a Synod, found in most States and Territories, may designate a parish as a parish mission if that parish is responsible for approved ministries of such special character and extent that the parish should be allowed to do one or more of the following:

  • to look beyond its own membership and bounds for additional persons to assist in the general oversight and management of the responsibilities of the parish
  • to seek additional financial support by appeal beyond the bounds of the parish, provided that such appeals shall not be addressed to parishes without prior consent of the appropriate body appointed or designated by the Synod